Category: Automotive

Great Classic Car Detailing Tips For Wheels And Engine

So youve finally finished restoring the classic car of your dreams. It runs great and youre ready to take it to a car show or a cruise night.

Unfortunately, it needs to be detailed. If youve spent a lot of money restoring the car yourself, youre probably looking at detailing the car yourself as well. For some, detailing may be harder than the restoration.

However, car detailing is not as tough as you may think.

The most important thing about detailing is giving yourself enough time to do the job right. If you dont, your car will look terrible and no one will appreciate the restoration job you did.

Weve highlighted two of the most common detailing problem areas below, your wheels/tires and engine. Weve also included some tips on how to clean and polish these problem areas.

Problem Area The Engine: If youre going to a car show, you want the engine to look great. Cleaning a classic car engine is one of the more tricky detailing steps. Before you start cleaning the engine, be sure the engine is cold. You can injure yourself if you try to clean a hot engine.

When cleaning the engine be sure to take the following steps:

Be sure to cover the intake, any filters as well as the alternator.

Use a degreaser to remove grease buildup in the engine bay.

Rinse the degreaser off and use a brush to remove any excess grease and dirt.

Let the engine dry and apply and polishes and/or waxes to make the engine shine.
Following these steps will get your engine looking great for your next car show.

Problem Area The Wheels And Tires

Your classic cars wheels and tires are probably another part you want to look spotless before a car show or cruise night. People have different methods for getting great looking tires and wheels.

The most important part is finding a good tire dressing formula that will not cause sling. If youre unfamiliar with the term “sling,” its the process when the tire dressing formula splatters onto the fenders and door while driving.

If you want your car to look great, youre going to need a good tire dressing formula.

Once youve found a good tire dressing formula follow these steps:

Spray tires and wheels removing any lose dirt and brake dust.

Use a tire cleaner along with a tire brush to remove brake dust and dirt.

Rinse tires again and dry. Be sure to remove all traces of the tire cleaner.

Apply a tire dressing formula to tires. Be sure to follow directions on the bottle.
Following these steps will help make your tires and wheels look great for your next car show or cruise night.


Cleaning the engine and tires are two of the toughest areas to clean on a classic car. Following the steps above will help keep you classic car looking great.

Be sure to take care of any routine maintenance issues before taking your car to a car show or cruise night. Having an auto repair manual can help you with maintenance issues. Auto repair manuals for classic cars can walk you through various maintenance issues.

V8 engine – Home Power Inverter – Rack Mount Ups

Applications Assembled overhead valve engine with heads and complete valve train but without manifolds, rocker covers, timing chain cover or oil pan The V8 with a crossplane crankshaft (see below) is a very common configuration for large automobile engines. V8 engines are rarely less than 3.0L (183cuin) in displacement and in automobile use have gone up to and beyond 8.2L (500cuin) in production vehicles. Industrial and marine V8 engines can be much larger.

Assembled and installed with all components as seen in a rear-wheel drive vehicle V8s are generally only standard on more powerful muscle cars, pony cars, sports cars, luxury cars, pickup trucks, and SUVs. However they are often optional on vehicles which have a V6 or straight-6 as standard engine. In many cases, V6 engines were derived from V8 designs by removing two cylinders without changing the V-angle so they can be built on the same assembly lines as the V8s and installed in the same engine compartments with few modifications. Some of these employed offset crankpins driving connecting rod pairs, enabling a more regular firing sequence.

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Cold Starting Devices for Diesel Engines

Attempting to start Diesel engines in cold or sub zero temperatures is extremely difficult and usually an impossible task, unless appropriate accessories has been added to the engine to assist in such starting.

The hard starting problems of diesel engines in below zero / freezing temperatures are caused by two factors. One is the initial cold air being drawn into the turbocharger and compressed into the engines cylinder head. The second is the fuel itself, is also cold and this sub zero / freezing temperature fuel is sprayed into the cold engines combustion chamber, where it mixes with the cold air drawn thru turbocharger.

Additional problems will result from fact that a cold starting diesel engine needs to reach at least two hundred (200) rpm to develop a four hundred (400) psi compression pressure to sufficiently compress the air to fuel mixture, and thus, resulting in combustion.

These two problems will result in the diesel fuel being sprayed into the combustion chamber, and it will condense on the cold surfaces of the cylinder liners or cylinder block. This liquid fuel will seep through the piston rings, and fall into the engines crankcase, diluting the lubricating oil in the process.

Two simple devices can be used to reduce the possibility that these conditions occur. One is by the use of battery heaters and glow plugs. No one device can be used. Usually a combination of several devices will provide an overall efficient starting process.

The efficiency of a battery drops as its temperature drops. A battery that is fully charged at 26 degrees C (80 degrees F) will have its starting capacity drop to approximately forty six percent (46%) available power at 17.7 degrees C below 0 (0 degrees F). Additionally, at this temperature, the engine will be approximately two and a half (2.5) times harder to start at -17.7 C (0 F) degrees due to thicker oil and resistance to movement of internal moving parts. This gets worst at lower temperatures are experienced.

To solve this, one of two common devices is used to heat the battery. One is a padded silicone covered, acid resistant rubber hot pad heater. This operates off of 110/120V and comes in various wattages. The power range can be 60W to 500W, and this can be used to heat the batteries, engine oil pan, fuel tank, hydraulic tank, and the water tank.

The other device that is typically used in conjunction with the hot pad is the glow plug. This is an internally fixed low voltage heating element that is fitted directly into the combustion chamber. When this is switched on, it can take up to two minutes to heat up, however, by that time it has reached approximately 700 degrees C (1652 degrees F) and the combustion chamber is hot enough to prevent the condensing of the diesel fuel, and thus, ignition is guaranteed.

This is to Note Motor Injection

What are the effects and the material turned motorcycle injection without waiting MIL lights on speedometers die?
At the time of ignition “ON” and the engine has not lived, then the fuel pump is already working and the fuel pump will provide the maximum pressure that the fuel will work perfectly when the machine is turned on first.

When the machine is turned on when the light is not dead MIL process that occurs at the fuel pump is not working as optimum standards (fuel pressure is still below the standard). As a result, at the start of the bike was not working at the optimum temperature (standard pressure), so that fuel consumption will be more, not direct maximum engine power and high exhaust gas emissions.

Functions and ways of working MIL lights, namely:
-To Detect early or as a marker if there is damage to Sitem PGMFI (Injection)
-To Read the damage caused to the Injection System by giving a wink to the MIL lamp.

How it works MIL lamp, are:
– If the condition PGMFI System (Injection) normal or no damage MIL lamp will illuminate when the ignition is “ON” and then will die back.
– If the condition PGMFI system (Injection) is not normal or no damage to the MIL lamp will blink, if the ignition “ON” and the MIL lamp will give you a code with a certain amount of flicker. The blinking it will give a message of damage that occurs so that riders would understand there is damage caused to the injection system.

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